History of Economics Playground

A blog by young and restless (and good looking) historians of economics

Rudolf Modley (?)

with 3 comments

There is a frequent bias in the history of science – and the history of economics alike. We are mainly interested in people who have published, and particularly in people having published in the main field we are interested in. People having greatly contributed to the development of departments – think of Aaron Director and Gregg Lewis at Chicago, for instance – or operating at the crossroads of disciplines are often neglected. When my co-author Loic Charles and I began to be interested in the history of visualization in the interwar social sciences in general and in the dispersion of Otto Neurath‘s pictorial statistics in the US in particular, we quickly found that one man was particularly influential in these developments: Rudolf Modley.

Modley, a former student of Neurath in Vienna, moved to the US in the early 30s, where he was appointed as curator of social sciences at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, under Waldemar Kaempffert (Neurath’s cousin). Modley, after experiencing numerous difficulties, created a flourishing business in illustrating magazines, newspapers, official reports and pamphlets with Neurath-like Isotypes. The name of his corporation, Pictograph Inc., could be seen anywhere in these different medias. As Loic and I put it in our paper: “the American reader was [then] more likely to encounter Modley’s version of [pictorial statistics], rather than the original [Neurath's]“. One could dismiss Modley as someone who’s only responsible for the little men and women we find on our bathroom doors. After all, Modley’s pictorial statistics was almost completely stripped of the theoretical and political contents Neurath would attach to it. Neurath himself was quite critical of the way his former disciple used his method. On the other hand, social scientists were very interested in Modley’s enterprise. In the course of our research, we have encountered some important names of social scientists of the period (including economists) who were quite eager to participate in the diffusion of Modley’s little men. On the whole, Modley is one of the central characters in the Americanization of Neurath’s visual method, namely its transformation from a tool of conceptualization into a tool of illustration and consequently, its move from social sciences to propaganda and finally, to graphic design.

Though he was the object of only one scholarly article (Crawley 1994) and was briefly mentioned in another one (Lupton 1986), Modley has lately attracted more and more fans on the internet. You just have to google his name to find several blog posts and websites devoted to his use of Neurath’s method. By contrast, when I began being interested in Modley while finishing my PhD dissertation in late 2007, there was almost nothing to be found on the internet. Meanwhile, websites devoted to pictorial statistics are flourishing (see examples here or here). Loic and I would like to take advantage of this recent proliferation and try to gather as much information as possible on Modley from all those contributors. In particular, if some people do know whether some archives exist and if so, where they are located, that would be highly useful for further research. Besides, we would be curious to know the various background of those who have contributed to disperse Modley’s pictures on the internet and how they got interested in his work in the first place.

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3 Responses

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  1. [...] research though. I relied heavily on both thenounproject.com and a book by Rudolf Modley entitled The History of Economics, which is an icon-lover’s dream. I also did a lot of iterating and tweaking. Things like [...]

  2. Hi Yann and Loic,

    I was interested to see this post on Modley, and particularly the link to your paper, which I wish I’d had when I was preparing my recent article on Modley, “An Unused Esperanto”: Internationalism and Pictographic Design, 1930-70″, which came out in Design and Culture, Volume 3, Number 1 (March 2011), pp. 5-24. I had a fruitful discussion with one of Modley’s children, who shared with me some personal details, but I didn’t come across any substantial archives of Modley’s work in my research (what happened to the archives of Pictograph Corporation? or Glyphs, Inc.?). Please keep me posted if you find any, and best of luck with your research.

    Keith Bresnahan
    kbresnahan@faculty.ocad.ca

    Keith Bresnahan

    29 July 2011 at 3:46 am

  3. hello yann
    My father Robert Haas, worked with Rudolf Modley in Vienna and NY. I have a few photostats of Thier work together. If you want to discuss this please contact me
    miriam

    mirri

    29 December 2012 at 2:21 am


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